Dispute over outdoor smoking ban call

26 Feb

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

See on Scoop.itHealth inequalities

When “Teaching Yourself Statistics” is No Match For Being a Doctor (with image, tweets) · karengeier

10 Feb

The Toronto Star ran a medically irresponsible story on their front page, then Heather Mallick doubled down on the story. What she didn’t expect was the invocation of Dr Ben Goldacre’s name would cause a firestorm.

Source: storify.com

See on Scoop.itPandemic (flu focus)

Life-saving baby screening expanded

5 Jan

Newborn babies across England will now be screened for more rare, debilitating genetic diseases.

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Newborn screening is one of the least controversial areas of public health in my experience – I would be surprised if the rest of the UK doesn’t follow suit and expand the screening programmes now (but I don’t know what the higher level discussions are…)

See on Scoop.itHealth inequalities

#fluscenario Pandemic phase

28 Nov

By the time the pandemic was declared, there were 400 UK cases, nearly 20k internationally

Newsnight Scotland discusses the pandemic

Links of interest:
What it was like – patient perspective and long recovery
What it was like – sudden death
What it was like – the mild asthmatic
What it was like – the pregnant woman
The doctor’s perspective

More information about pregnancy and swine flu, and
here

Questions you might want to discuss:

Planning figures suggested up to 50% of the population might get ill, and a large number might need Intensive Care. How will the system cope?
If pregnant women are more at risk, what effect might that have?
Imagine now that numbers just grow and grow and grow. Services start to be overwhelmed. How are prioritisation decisions made, about who gets intensive care? ECMO?
How do hospitals provide all that extra intensive care at short notice?
Can you remember what projected deaths might have been? How would your home town have coped if 1.5% of the population had died within 2 weeks?
What happens to public services if 50% of the population is ill?
What do the people coordinating these services normally do? What’s happening to those tasks?

#fluscenario Early days in the UK

28 Nov

Some extra links to show what was going on in the UK

UK infections
World reactions
BBC sound file – is swine flu being over-hyped? 
School closures and here

Panic begins over drug availability (REMEMBER: No vaccine has been developed yet)
GPs might not work in pandemic

3 weeks in – cases in the UK #fluscenario

28 Nov

By this stage, human cases of swine influenza A/H1N1 have been reported in many countries including the UK (Scotland). WHO has raised the pandemic alert level to Phase 4. This indicates that the likelihood of a pandemic has increased, but not that a pandemic is inevitable.

 

What do you think about…?

1. If antivirals and vaccines are/will be available, how do we identify priority groups, how best to communicate with them and how best to deliver them?
2. If the pandemic takes off, what resources are likely to be needed to deal with the consequences and who might supply them? Note: in this scenario, some of the ‘priority groups’ will be those who can help maintain public order and essential services.
3. At what point do you think about cancelling public events to minimise spread of disease and how do you manage communication to minimise panic?
4. As a healthcare professional should you address false information or engage with patients on social media? What are the implications either way?

Welcome to #fluscenario

28 Nov

Fluscenario for Group D is beginning just now. More information can be found here.

Resources for #fluscenario

28 Nov

Most resources and links for this session can be found here. These pages can also be found on medblogs.

#fluscenario Early flu in Mexico

28 Nov

This BBC Video clip about early response to swine flu in Mexico might give you some idea what it was like when swine flu started in Mexico – how do you think we were planning in the UK at the time?

Some questions for discussion:

1. Why should we be concerned about flu?
2. What is the role of a doctor/the NHS in planning for events like these?
3. Pandemic flu is being planned for at a national level. What could you be doing now to help you and your organisation if pandemic flu were to reach the UK?
4. What social media accounts, organisations or individuals would you trust? Would you be happy to discuss over social networks with other Health Care Professionals or would you prefer a closed forum? How would you ensure reliable information?

#fluscenario Pandemic phase

27 Nov

By the time the pandemic was declared, there were 400 UK cases, nearly 20k internationally

Newsnight Scotland discusses the pandemic

Links of interest:
What it was like – patient perspective and long recovery
What it was like – sudden death
What it was like – the mild asthmatic
What it was like – the pregnant woman
The doctor’s perspective

More information about pregnancy and swine flu, and
here

Questions you might want to discuss:

Planning figures suggested up to 50% of the population might get ill, and a large number might need Intensive Care. How will the system cope?
If pregnant women are more at risk, what effect might that have?
Imagine now that numbers just grow and grow and grow. Services start to be overwhelmed. How are prioritisation decisions made, about who gets intensive care? ECMO?
How do hospitals provide all that extra intensive care at short notice?
Can you remember what projected deaths might have been? How would your home town have coped if 1.5% of the population had died within 2 weeks?
What happens to public services if 50% of the population is ill?
What do the people coordinating these services normally do? What’s happening to those tasks?